UIF for Domestic Workers

South African labour laws require that domestic workers who work more than 24 hours a month must be registered for the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF). This includes part-time and full-time domestic workers.

The fund provides the following benefits:

  •  Unemployment benefits - A domestic worker who contributed to the fund and whose employment has been terminated can claim. You cannot claim if you resign from your job.
  • Illness benefits - A domestic worker who is unable to work because of ill health can claim for six months.
  •  Death benefits - If a domestic worker who contributed to the fund dies, their dependants can claim.
  • Adoption benefits - A worker who contributes to the fund who is adopting children below two years of age can claim if they take unpaid leave to look after the child.
  • Maternity benefits - A domestic worker who is pregnant can claim maternity benefits before and after the child is born.

The amount that you can claim depends on how long you have been contributing to the fund. You will be paid a percentage of up to 58% of a day's salary for every six days that you worked while contributing to the fund.

In order to benefit from the fund, you need to:

Registering

It is the employer's responsibility to register their domestic worker with the UIF.

You can register a domestic worker for UIF in one of the following ways:

  • By submitting the completed registration forms.
  • By registering over the phone.
  • By registering online.

To register, you will need to have your ID number and your domestic worker's ID number, residential address and contact details. Form UI 8 D must be completed with the employer's details and form UI 19 D must be completed with the domestic worker's details.

You can submit the completed forms by:

These forms can also be faxed to you. Dial 086 712 2000 and follow the instructions and the forms will be sent to you. If you get forms this way, you need to fax the completed forms back to 086 713 3000.

Registering telephonically:
You can register by calling 012 337 1680 during office hours. You will need to have the employer and employee's ID numbers.

Online registration:
You can also register online. You will need to fill out the online registration form, then you will be given a logon name and password. Your password and account will be activated within 48 hours. You can then submit your declarations online.

Paying Monthly Contributions

Every month, the employer contributes 1% of what they pay to the domestic worker to the UIF. The domestic worker also contributes 1%. It is the employer's responsibility to ensure that these payments are made.

The contributions must be paid before the seventh of every month. Alternatively, the contributions can be paid in advance every three, six or 12 months. Employers registered for tax purposes must pay their contribution to the South African Revenue Service. Those employers who are not registered for tax purposes must pay their contributions directly to the UIF.

If you would like to pay your contributions once a year rather than every month, you need to send a request to annual.upfront(at)labour.gov.za. You need to include your employer reference number in the message.

Applying for Benefits

If you are a domestic worker who is registered with the UIF and you have been making the required contributions to the fund, you can claim illness, maternity, adoption and dependant's benefits.

When you apply for these benefits, you will need to have:

  • A copy of your ID.
  • A copy of your payslips - you will need two payslips if you get paid once a month and four payslips if you get paid every week.
  • A service certificate from your employer.
  • A fully completed application form.
  •  Form UI 19 containing your details.

For more information:

 It is the duty of the employer to register a domestic worker. Failure to adhere to this legal requirement is punishable by the Department of Labour.

Domestic workers who work for more than one employer have to be registered with each employer.

 Article cited from Capegateway

Page Created: 02 March 2012